Capital Crimes: London Mysteries

Capital Crimes London Mysteries am Book I really enjoy these collections of Golden Age mystery stories And I m thankful for Martin Edwards and Poisoned Pen Press for their efforts to keep them befor

Capital Crimes: London Mysteries am Book I really enjoy these collections of Golden Age mystery stories. And I'm thankful for Martin Edwards and Poisoned Pen Press for their efforts to keep them before the public eye. They so much deserve to be read by ongoing generations. In our era where so many forms of media seem to deal with mystery primarily through use of violence and emphasis on overt terror, these stories are more subtle. Some undoubtedly will consider these a bit too quiet but I look forward to them. In this collection of about 20, there was only one story that disappointed me.All of the tales here take place within the city of London. The streets, parks, place names figure prominently in each one and sometimes are part of the character too. A quote I found particularly good is from "The Hands of Mr Ottermole":He wasn't, this man, a bad man. Indeed, he had many of the social and amiable qualities, and passed as a respectable man, as as most successful criminals do. But the thought had come into his moldering mind that he would like to murder somebody, and as he held no fear of God or man, he was going to do it, andwould then go home to HIS tea. I don't say that flippantly, butas a statement of fact. Strange as it may seem to the humane,murderers must and do sit down to meals after a murder. There is no reason why they shouldn't, and many reasons why they should. For one thing, they need to keep their physical and mental vitality at full beat for the business of covering their crime. For another, the strain of their effort makes them hungry, and satisfaction at the accomplishment of a desired thing brings a feeling of relaxation toward human pleasures. (loc 2638)This is from a story Ellery Queen felt was perhaps the finest crime story written. While I did guess the outcome of a couple of stories, they were still effective. The writing, plot construction and characters make this a worthwhile read for those who enjoy mysteries.Definitely recommended...and I do hope there will be more collections to come. I'm building a list of Golden Age authors to seek out!A copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review.. With its fascinating mix of people rich and poor, British and foreign, worthy and suspicious London is a city where anything can happen The possibilities for criminals and for the crime writer are endless London has been home to many of fiction s finest detectives, and the setting for mystery novels and short stories of the highest quality Capital Crimes is an eclecWith its fascinating mix of people rich and poor, British and foreign, worthy and suspicious London is a city where anything can happen The possibilities for criminals and for the crime writer are endless London has been home to many of fiction s finest detectives, and the setting for mystery novels and short stories of the highest quality Capital Crimes is an eclectic collection of London based crime stories, blending the familiar with the unexpected in a way that reflects the personality of the city Alongside classics by Margery Allingham, Anthony Berkeley and Thomas Burke are excellent and unusual stories by authors who are far less well known The stories give a flavour of how writers have tackled crime in London over the span of than half a century Their contributions range from an early serial killer thriller set on the London Underground and horrific vignettes to cerebral whodunits What they have in common is an atmospheric London setting, and enduring value as entertainment.. The best Books Capital Crimes: London Mysteries In the early decades of the Twentieth Century, London was arguably the greatest city in the world. Sure, New York was nipping at its heels, and Paris could out-do both in terms of culture, but London remained the vibrant capital of a globe-spanning empire. It's no surprise that the London of that era remains a popular setting for novels, from smoke-clouded gaslights to the London Underground to 221B Baker Street. With such a wide body of London-based fiction to choose from, it seems natural that the British Library would build one of its first two original anthologies around London mysteries. As the Golden Age of detection is largely associated with British writers of the 1920s-'30s, it makes sense that the series would focus on the iconic capital, home to many a good mystery. As always, Martin Edwards provides an excellent introduction to the volume, and more informative introductions to each story. As part of the British Library Crime Classics series, it is available now in the UK and will release in North America on June 2nd through Poisoned Pen Press.Some of the earlier stories are a bit dry, though Edwards' introduction gives them historical (and authorial) context, and Golden Age readers should well be familiar with the time period. Though there are a pair of big names (Conan Doyle and Margery Allingham), many of the authors are not as well-known today, and most are overdue for rediscovery---Edwards has a knack for pulling long-lost authors out of the past's overlooked shelves, and gives each one a stellar introduction. Together, the London of these stories becomes a wonderful and atmospheric element, the perfect cityscape for half a century of classic crimes. No matter what elements of Golden Age Mystery you enjoy most, there's probably something here to interest you: puzzlers, whodunits, some thrillers and suspense tales, some crime-focused stories, and a number of detective tales both straight-laced and sensational.I'm more familiar with Ernest Bramah from his Kai Lung fantasies of a China that never was, but here he provides a quite serviceable detective tale featuring a blind detective. Despite how gimmicky that sounds, it's well-realized depiction, as the blind man and one of his colleagues meet with one Mr. Poleash, fearing for his life after marital indiscretion; shortly afterwards, Poleash is found dead in his own apartment. R. Austin Freeman's "Magic Casket" is a tale of scientific detection with strong "yellow peril" undertones, as Japanese criminals harass an elderly woman who deals in antiquities for a seemingly worthless carved casket. J.S. Fletcher has a similar use of sensational elements in his "The Magician of Cannon Street," where a hypnotic murderer from a two-year-old crime is tracked down using clever disguises---an intriguing story that kept me reading, if a bit daft with some of its ideas.Richard Marsh's "The Finchley Puzzle" features female detective Judith Lee, who's honed her lip-reading skills as a teacher for the deaf. As criminals make failed attempts at Lee's life, an elderly couple living alone are found dead in their separate bedrooms, each untouched and uninjured. "The Tea Leaf" by Eustace and Jepson is the obligatory impossible crime, and it's a real humdinger---a man is murdered in a sauna with only one way in and out, right after quarreling with his rival, who pleads innocence; with that kind of set-up, you can expect an ingenious solution.The first tale, "The Case of Lady Sannox" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is one of several pieces combining horror and mystery. Doyle's morbid little tale involves an arrogant surgeon called out to help a Turkish merchant whose wife had cut herself on a poisoned scimitar, and ends on the kind of chilling nastiness that makes Victorian-era horror so effective. There's another suspenseful, horror-ish tale in "The Hands of Mr. Ottermole," about a serial killer who's strangling victims to death quite literally under the noses of the local police. Panic grips London as more bodies are found and the authorities come no closer to finding the mysterious killer; the conclusion is a wicked-sharp twist that caught me off guard. John Oxenham's "A Mystery of the Underground" has another serial killer on the lose, slaying victims on the Tube and creating panic in the streets. Oxenham's story is more sensational and less suspenseful, but he writes it rather well in an epistolary style, with journalists reporting the sudden murders and almost bumping into the killer themselves.Together with Resorting to Murder: Holiday Mysteries, Capital Crimes makes a great case for the British Library Crime Classics' ability to craft original anthologies of vintage stories... though with Martin Edwards at the tiller, this should be expected. The quality and variety of the tales is astounding; Edwards has dug out some excellent stories by now-unknown authors. No matter what type of mystery you prefer, from puzzlers to suspense tales, there will be something here for you---not all may be your cup of tea, but I found the collection to be well-rounded enough that even the stories that normally are not my cup of tea were enjoyable and of high quality. A mystery reader interested in the Golden Age may well profit from these volumes, while a newer reader may find them informative of what authors and what kinds of stories they prefer. Readers more familiar with modern bestsellers may be disappointed by the older prose styles, but I think readers who know what they're getting into will find Capital Crimes an excellent survey of the genre circa the first half of the 20th Century.
Capital Crime is a festival that entertains and engages Our fresh and innovative festival programme features leading crime and thriller creatives Capital Crime welcomes some of the world s favourite authors and filmmakers to London We bring the best of everything crime and thriller to fans. Capital Crimes London Mysteries by Martin Edwards Feb , Capital Crimes is an eclectic collection of London based crime stories, blending the familiar with the unexpected in a way that reflects the personality of the city Alongside classics by Margery Allingham, Anthony Berkeley and Thomas Burke are excellent and unusual stories by authors who are far less well known. Capital Crimes London Mysteries Martin Edwards The British Library, as part of its British Crime Classics series, has produced Capital Crimes London Mysteries, edited by the highly regarded mystery writer Martin Edwards The collection is comprised of stories that are about as varied as the genre of mystery and detective novels. Capital Crimes London Mysteries British Library Crime Jun , Mystery crime fiction written in the Golden Age of Murder Capital Crimes is an eclectic collection of London based crime stories, blending the familiar with the unexpected in a way that reflects the personality of the city Alongside classics by Margery Allingham, Anthony Berkeley and Thomas Burke are excellent and unusual stories by authors who are far less well known. Capital Crimes Seven Centuries of London Life and Murder Sep , Capital Crimes tells the shifting story of crime and punishment in London through vivid re creations of a series of murders that stretches from the killing of Roger Legett, a notorious questmonger, during the Peasants Revolt in , through to the hanging of Styllou Christofi in . Capital Crimes London Mysteries by Martin Edwards Alibris Capital Crimes is an eclectic collection of London based crime stories, blending the familiar with the unexpected in a way that reflects the personality of the city Alongside Read More With its fascinating mix of people rich and poor, British and foreign, worthy and suspicious London is a city where anything can happen. Capital Crimes London Mysteries A British Library Crime Capital Crimes is an eclectic collection of London based crime stories, blending the familiar with the unexpected in a way that reflects the personality of the city Alongside classics by Margery Crime in London London overtook New York in murders for the first time for this month as the capital endured a dramatic surge in knife crime This resulted in New York recorded murders during January through March whereas London recorded However, longer term data clearly shows that New York has far homicides than London. How dangerous is your Borough London crime statistics Jun , Over , crimes were reported across London between June and June Westminster has the highest crime count in London, with , reported crimes during the financial year After an unusually calm summer due to lockdown, reported crime went up by .% from June to July . Capital punishment in the United Kingdom Capital punishment in the United Kingdom was used from ancient times until the second half of the th century The last executions in the United Kingdom were by hanging, and took place in , before capital punishment was suspended for murder in and finally abolished in in Northern Ireland Although unused, the death penalty remained a legally defined punishment for certain

  1. Martin Edwards was educated in Northwich and at Balliol College, Oxford University, taking a first class honours degree in law He trained as a solicitor in Leeds and moved to Liverpool on qualifying in 1980 He published his first legal article at the age of 25 and become a partner in the firm of Mace and Jones in 1984.He is married to Helena with two children Jonathan and Catherine and lives in Lymm Martin is a member of the Murder Squad collective of crime writers, and is chairman of the nominations sub committee for the CWA Diamond Dagger crime writing s most prestigious award In 2007 he was appointed the Archivist of the Crime Writers Association.

932 Reply to “Capital Crimes: London Mysteries”

  1. I really enjoy these collections of Golden Age mystery stories And I m thankful for Martin Edwards and Poisoned Pen Press for their efforts to keep them before the public eye They so much deserve to be read by ongoing generations In our era where so many forms of media seem to deal with mystery primarily through use of violence and emphasis on overt terror, these stories are subtle Some undoubtedly will consider these a bit too quiet but I look forward to them In this collection of about 20, th [...]


  2. In the early decades of the Twentieth Century, London was arguably the greatest city in the world Sure, New York was nipping at its heels, and Paris could out do both in terms of culture, but London remained the vibrant capital of a globe spanning empire It s no surprise that the London of that era remains a popular setting for novels, from smoke clouded gaslights to the London Underground to 221B Baker Street With such a wide body of London based fiction to choose from, it seems natural that th [...]


  3. The streets of LondonFrom Sherlock Holmes to Lacey Flint, many of the detectives I have loved over the years have been based in London And why not One of the most cosmopolitan cities in the world with a history stretching back for over a millennium, it has always been a contrast of bright lights and dark alleyways, extreme wealth and desperate poverty, and every one of its ancient streets is drenched in the blood of the victims of its horrid past Visitors love nothing than to shiver in the Lond [...]


  4. An intriguing selection of short London based mysteries by a variety of writers Probably the most memorable for me is the opening non Holmes tale by Arthur Conan Doyle, which is horror than crime I wished I hadn t read this one before bedtime, but it was a brilliant story Also included are a Campion story by Margery Allingham and a Doctor Thorndyke story by R Austin Freeman and a great story by Anthony Berkeley which was an early version of his novel The Poisoned Chocolates Case, fortunately wi [...]


  5. If anyone wants a lesson in how to write a next to perfect crime story, you must read this collection, it s absolutely divine The wide range of authors all add their individual magic to their wonderful stories, and Martin Edwards s synopsis about the author and their work at the beginning of each story is such a treat I would love to dip into this over and over again.


  6. I really enjoyed this, good selection of stories with very short but useful introductions to each about the author that contextualises things I liked all the stories although obviously some are worse than others, I found even the worse ones enjoyable enough and interesting often from a stylistic period writing perspective Like a few of them were very pulpy but I still found them a lot of fun and it was cool seeing a different style of writing to that I m used to The content varies too some are s [...]


  7. Review Title It was a dark and stormy and short nightLondon is both a world metropolis, the financial capital of the world, and a leading light of culture, fashion, and technology It is also at times and places dark, foreboding, and mysterious, and the setting for many a crime story, both true and fictional Here is a collection of short crime fiction all set in London and taking advantage of the settings to drive plot and mood.Editor Martin Edwards has collected stories from what he calls the go [...]


  8. A fascinating compendium of short murder mysteries set in London Mostly by writers now forgotten, but all of them fine stories Arranged in chronological order, from Victorian times to the end of the Second World War Part of a series curated by the British Library I shall be trying some of the others


  9. I never seem to be able to get into short stories, they seem to take ages to get through and there are always some that are great but the majority are fillers This collection didn t buck the trend A couple of nice twists and one particular tale that was Conan Doyle than Conan Doyle and the first story IS a Conan Doyle.


  10. I was practically blown away by this compilation of crime short stories with setting in London It will definitely help you appreciate this collection if you have a high regard for classical crime writing Each story had it s own particular favorable aspect Even the story I didn t like as much was only not as well liked because it was so well written that it made me uncomfortable to read it These are seventeen stories from the old school of crime writing They are arranged or less in chronological [...]


  11. It is interesting reading stories from some of the less well known names from the Golden Age of British crime fiction in this fascinating collection of short stories compiled and edited by Martin Edwards who also writes an introduction to the book and brief details of the author at the beginning of each story Margery Allingham and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are well known in the field but you may not have realised for example that E M Delafield Diary of a Provincial Lady also wrote crime fiction.I f [...]



  12. Another in my favourite series of mysteries published by the British Library and edited by Martin Edwards who seems to have an encyclopedic knowledge of what is known as the Golden Age or Crime, or the years between WWI and WW2 This book is different from the others I have read as it contains 17 short stories, all set in London Some are by well known names Ellery Queen, Margery Allingham and even Hugh Walpole of the Herries series of novels We meet a number of detectives who have appeared in ser [...]


  13. This collection took a while to warm up, but the second half was definitely worth waiting for Burke s The Hands of Mr Ottermole was superbly written, albeit with a predictable finish Bailey s The Little House and Walpole s The Silver Mask both provided wonderful creepiness Ethel Lina White never fails to deliver excellent suspense Berkeley s original poisoned chocolates short story was great to read, even after reading the full length version Gilbert s You Can t Hang Twice was a fitting end to a [...]


  14. A great readI enjoy what I call golden era books, but this was exceptional The stories were unpredictable on the whole and some were pure horror.



  15. I ve been reading this book for quite a while, but don t let that length of time fool you This is a collection of short story classic crime mysteries, all set in London Every story found in this collection is different Instead of sitting down and reading this book in it s entirety, I ve been enjoying it over the course of two months, picking it up and reading a short mystery here and there.I liked how editor Mr Edwards provides not only an introduction to the overall theme of the book, but also [...]


  16. This is a collection of short story crime mysteries that are in London I ve been reading this book off and on as I don t like to go to one story to the next I like to think about each story what I liked and what I didn t The stories have amateur sleuths and Scotland Yard detectives The stories are whodunit or and suspenseful The stories were published from the late 19th century to mid 20th century.The editor does a great job of describing what to expect in this book Information on the author and [...]


  17. I tend to think that detective stories whether in books or on TV need room to breathe That s why I prefer novels to short stories and the 2 hour long Inspector Morse or Foyle s War TV programmes rather than the 2 hour travesties that were the later Taggarts These are a collection of short stories all London set and are variable in quality They range from Sherlock Holmes style stories i.e Detective sidekick through to golden age of crime stories None are from authors that are particularly well kn [...]


  18. Another excellent collection of classic and lesser known detective stories edited by Martin Edwards, this time all connected by their London setting The short introductions to each story are informative without giving too much away and there is the usual mix of well known and obscure authors The collection begins with a chilling tale by Conan Doyle, which does not feature Sherlock Holmes but is nevertheless grippingly told John Oxenham s A Mystery of the Underground tells the story of a serial [...]


  19. I have always been partial to British Murder Mysteries, so when I found this book on NetGalley I really wanted to read it, and I was super excited when I got a copy of the book in exchange for a review For whatever reason I had a really hard time connecting with the book, so I set it aside for a bit, and then picked it up again only to find that it seemed like a chore to read than enjoyment, which was so puzzling to me since these are exactly the kind of stories I like The book is filled with 1 [...]


  20. An amazing potluck of delectable mystery dishes is served up in this London based anthology a few by writers you know Conan Doyle, for example, though not a Holmes tale and several others, but many are by writers lost in time and the tens of thousands books published each year.But you ll want to dig into these seventeen differing offerings and meet writers you will be tracking down long after you ve swept through this delicious and delectable spread you ll be coming back for and if you don t li [...]


  21. Another very good collection of detective mystery thriller short stories This title only contains stories set in London Most of the authors I had heard of for a change and enjoyed all of the stories.It makes me miss the days of monthly crime story magazines Ellet queen , Alfred Hitchcock etc when authors could learn their craft by creating mystery miniatures before progressing to full then novels.


  22. Given 5 stars for the range of authors, Martin Edward s super introduction and information throughout It is a wonderful collection of short crime stories featuring London from the golden age of crime, featuring authors, not given as much time today Not all authors will appeal, but it has made e want to discover books by Richard Marsh and Ethel Lina White Highly recommended for reading during a London commute.


  23. A book of puzzles, really Not crosswords or Suduko, but detective stories of a very high standard All tales are set in historic London and were written by the well established authors of their day some of them members of the Detection Club, an association of top crime writers Short stories readable within about half an hour each There are seventeen cracking yarns here Very entertaining I can recommend this book to those who like to really tax their brains.


  24. A thoroughly enjoyable survey of British crime set in its capital city A wide range of styles are included in this anthology a fan of crime fiction is sure to find a small treasure and a new author to track down I especially enjoyed A Mystery of the Underground, The Hands of Mr Ottermole, and The Unseen Door each a very good example of their day A great choice for folding into bed with.I received an EARC from the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.


  25. A really, really nice collection of London based crime mystery short stories from the late Victorian period to the early mid twentieth century Martin Edwards editing is superb, as are the brief introductions to each story Highly, highly recommended.I particularly enjoyed Doyle s The Case of Lady Sannox , Marsh s The Finchley Puzzle , Eustace and Jepson s The Tea Leaf , Burke s The Hands of Mr Ottermole , and White s Cheese.


  26. An nostalgic look at some favorite British mystery writers lesser known works The quality of the stories range from obvious first time writer to a polished Arthur Conan Doyle tale Some other sixteen authors are Margery Allingham, Thomas Burke, Hugh Walpole, and J S Fletcher Readers will find at least one London based story that fits their interests.


  27. Capital Crimes is series of short stories from the golden age of crime writing in London There are early stories from a variety of writers that while popular during their lifetimes, are largely forgotten today That s what makes these stories intriguing There is an interesting mix contained within the pages that add up to a fun read But then I like short stories for summer reading.


  28. An engaging assortment of short crime stories mainly from the period between the two world wars some by well known writers, others by writers little known today The quality is inevitably slightly variable, but most of the stories are good and some are really excellent Reading this book is a good way to pass some winter evenings.


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