Sick Caesars: Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome

Books Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome of Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome Hardcover Condition Used GoodSold by greatbuybooks_us I would urge you to

Books Sick Caesars: Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome 1 of: Sick Caesars - Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome [Hardcover:] Condition: Used - GoodSold by: greatbuybooks_us £1.69I would urge you to read Suetonius rather than Grant. This is just taking the medical snippets out of Grant's own Suetonius rip off, and he doesn't even have the decency to liven it up at all with a jest or jape.I bought this as a fun powder room read but it may well go down the pan instead... duh-doh! Take for example Tiberius, a mere four sides took him from cradle to grave and nary a mention of illness.. Sick Caesars: Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome Viral Book From the ascension of Augustus to the division of the eastern and western empires in 364, Sick Caesars investigates the illnesses that led to the rise and fall of the Roman emperors and, to some extent, the Roman Empire itself Continually plagued by plots and intrigues, the Caesars had every reason to live in fear and suspicion.Michael Grant discusses how, aside from emotFrom the ascension of Augustus to the division of the eastern and western empires in 364, Sick Caesars investigates the illnesses that led to the rise and fall of the Roman emperors and, to some extent, the Roman Empire itself Continually plagued by plots and intrigues, the Caesars had every reason to live in fear and suspicion.Michael Grant discusses how, aside from emotional anxieties, the emperors were visited by any number of diseases which the stress of their position seemed only to exacerbate Alcoholism and epilepsy were two illnesses commonly shared by the Caesars, and the list of maladies goes on to include schizophrenia, hyperthyroidism, acute encephalitis, and congenital cerebral paralysis, to name just a few.Their illnesses, both psychological and physical, helped shape the course of history Aurelius probably would have invaded Germany had he not suffered from bad health, and Septimius Severus likely would have conquered the whole of Britain had his health not prevented him The emotional disorders of the emperors run the gamut, from the mildly sadistic Domitian was in the habit, in his free time, of pulling the wings off flies to the bizarre Caracalla was known to frequent brothels, driving out the prostitutes and prostituting himself in their place to the frighteningly homicidal Caligula stored the corpses of murdered women under his floorboards Sick Caesars is an account, sometimes funny, sometimes tragic, of men transformed, and often deranged, by absolute power Included are Julius CaesarTrajanAugustusHadrianTiberiusMarcusAureliusCaligulaCommodusClaudiusCaracallaDomitianDiocletianNervaConstantineAbout the Author Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, Michael Grant is the author of dozens of books on the ancient and classical worlds, including Guide to the Ancient World, The Twelve Caesars, Saint Peter, and The Ancient Historians.. Michael Grant was an English classisist, numismatist, and author of numerous popular books on ancient history His 1956 translation of Tacitus s Annals of Imperial Rome remains a standard of the work He once described himself as one of the very few freelances in the field of ancient history a rare phenomenon As a popularizer, his hallmarks were his prolific output and his unwillingness to oversimplify or talk down to his readership.Librarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread for information.. The best Book Sick Caesars: Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome I really wanted to "like" this book, and there were moments, (sections, or a chapter or two) that I did. That said, the book felt more like a school paper. Numerous quotes from other authors, which in many cases made me want to check out their works on this subject and abandon this one. Not only were there an extraordinary amounts of quotes from others, but the author often was quoting himself... Which to me seemed strange and overdone.The book, which has 178 pages total, is actually only a little over 90 pages; the rest consist of resources, reference notes, and images as well as an overview of the main Caesars covered in the book. So at 90 pages this is a quick read.While any lover of history will have strong opinions, this author seems to go overboard, in voicing his, going off on subjects such as astrology, and dreams / God. So as the author will state a few times, "skip the present passage..." If this offends..." So beware if you have strong views of such subjects.The subject of "sick Caesars" fascinated me, looking back, it seemed rushed and incomplete. It is not without its merits though and was a very easy reading book for the most part. If you want an overview of the Caesars and what ailed them, then pick this up.... But if you have a deep love of history, especially Roman, when done you will probably feel like a rock skipping on the water and be left feeling not quite satisfied.I could easily give this a three star rating, but dropped a star as I think this author was capable of much more.
Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome by From the ascension of Augustus to the division of the eastern and western empires in , Sick Caesars investigates the illnesses that led to the rise and fall of the Roman emperors and, to some extent, the Roman Empire itself Continually plagued by plots and intrigues, the Caesars had every reason to live in fear and suspicion. Sick Caesars, Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome Michael Jan , Customer . out of stars Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome Reviewed in the United States on June , Michael Grant has earned a respected place as an historian of ancient Rome This book does nothing to enhance it. Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome Jan , Grant lumps this condition in with Caesar s epilepsy and all the rest of the ailments psychosomatic and otherwise with which his successors were afflicted and which played a significant role in the history of the Roman State Clearly, astrology is superstitious nonsense, and nothing except ignorance keeps it alive today. Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Sick Caesars by GRANT, Michael Barnes Noble, Hardcover Good Disclaimer A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition All pages are intact, and the cover is intact The spine may show signs of wear Pages can include limited notes and highlighting, and the copy can include previous owner inscriptions At ThriftBooks, our motto is Read More, Spend Less.Dust jacket Sick Caesars Madness and Malady In Imperial Rome by Grant Find Sick Caesars Madness and Malady In Imperial Rome by Grant, Michael at Biblio Uncommonly good collectible and rare books from uncommonly good booksellers Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome by In my most recent read of one of his works is Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome In ancient Rome, no one possessed power than the emperor That is why from their wars they fought, to there intricacies, and every other aspect of their lives has Sick Caesars edition Open Library Dec , Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome This edition published in by Barnes Noble Books ID Numbers Open Library OLM Internet Archive sickcaesarsgran ISBN ISBN Library Sick Caesar Remove Bush from office Freepress Since the United States, if it indulges the apparent madness of Bush, will embark on a course similar to imperial Rome, historical analogies may be found in Michael Grant s book, Sick Caesars, Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome. Caesars Entertainment buys bookmaker William Hill for Sep , ATLANTIC CITY, N.J AP Caesars Entertainment said Wednesday it is buying the British bookmaker William Hill for . billion in a deal aimed

  1. Michael Grant was an English classisist, numismatist, and author of numerous popular books on ancient history His 1956 translation of Tacitus s Annals of Imperial Rome remains a standard of the work He once described himself as one of the very few freelances in the field of ancient history a rare phenomenon As a popularizer, his hallmarks were his prolific output and his unwillingness to oversimplify or talk down to his readership.Librarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread for information.

490 Reply to “Sick Caesars: Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome”

  1. I really wanted to like this book, and there were moments, sections, or a chapter or two that I did That said, the book felt like a school paper Numerous quotes from other authors, which in many cases made me want to check out their works on this subject and abandon this one Not only were there an extraordinary amounts of quotes from others, but the author often was quoting himself Which to me seemed strange and overdone.The book, which has 178 pages total, is actually only a little over 90 pag [...]


  2. Overall, interesting to read The book reinforced the concept that the peculiarities or sicknesses of people in power have a great effect on the course of history But the author seems to have no respect for the opinions of his readers he scorns Roman practices and culture often Which I personally found annoying It even seemed like he had written several books on Roman customs and history was he has snide in his other books If so, I wouldn t read them The illnesses in the Caesars seemed to have be [...]


  3. 1 of Sick Caesars Madness and Malady in Imperial Rome Hardcover Condition Used GoodSold by greatbuybooks_us 1.69I would urge you to read Suetonius rather than Grant This is just taking the medical snippets out of Grant s own Suetonius rip off, and he doesn t even have the decency to liven it up at all with a jest or jape.I bought this as a fun powder room read but it may well go down the pan instead duh doh Take for example Tiberius, a mere four sides took him from cradle to grave and nary a men [...]


  4. I don t know why it s so satisfying to read about Augustus Caesar s migraines, or the fact that battle so unnerved him that he d have to lie down nursing his head until the fighting was over Maybe it s just me Anyway, this book gives a really fascinating medical history of the Caesars, though in many places Michael Grant is simply quoting himself from one of his other books, which felt somehow cheap Also, he digresses into a couple of oddly vehement rants about the disease of believing in astrol [...]




  5. Some accounts were good, however he contradicts himself by admitting that belief in astrology isn t a sickness he claims probably 10 15 Caesars are sick this way.


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